Joao Martins

What’s Next in Audio?

April 14 2014, 11:10

audioXpress is deeply rooted in the R&D and DIY audio communities. So is Elektor, our sister publication that originated in Europe. Elektor International Media (EIM) group publishes Elektor, audioXpress, Voice Coil, the Loudspeaker Industry Sourcebook, and Circuit Cellar.

 

For those interested in building electronic things, analog or digital, audio related or not, for a hobby, addiction, or pure passion, we recommend Elektor as a must-read practical electronics magazine. You will not be disappointed. Because audioXpress is part of the EIM group, we share common resources such as our excellent Elektor.LABS service and web community. Projects from around the world can be submitted—and you are immediately rewarded for your submission. Your project’s development can be supported by our team of experts, as well as other members. So, we would like to invite all our audioXpress members to register at www.elektor-labs.com. Check it out! You will see there are already several interesting audio-related projects you can follow and discuss.

 

We also have exciting things on the horizon for all DIY audio aficionados. You will be the first to hear about them if you are a member of the Elektor.LABS community.

On a similar note, we are approaching the publication date of our Loudspeaker Industry Sourcebook (LIS), which this year will include a searchable online version. There is no better way to find a supplier for anything audio-related be it speakers, transducers, amplifier modules, components, or any other part for your projects, from prototype stages to high-volume production.

For this year’s LIS, our team has been compiling and analyzing important trends. It’s clear the audio industry is speaking volumes in completely new areas (e.g., Bluetooth speakers and anything mobile) while “wearable” concepts are about to revolutionize the market. Just like tour-guided systems enable you to receive relevant information in different languages by walking into an exhibit and approaching a display, now personal mobile devices and wireless transmissions will expand the concept to the retail and entertainment markets. Such products already exist for sports events, and soon those collective experiences will be reinforced with “bring-your-own” personal devices. These notions weren’t feasible five years ago, because the technology was not there—or was simply too complicated and expensive.

At the same time, clever ideas without business plans to back them up don’t necessarily equal product success. Nor does it mean all ideas should immediately be converted into crowd-funded campaigns on Kickstarter. Doing so risks turning a valuable resource designed to help finance new start-ups into a site filled with collective deceptions.

We’ve seen examples of many “good-idea” products introduced on Kickstarter that are not viable in the real market. And remember, one product is not a company and not a business by itself. You need a market opportunity larger than one single product idea.

Also, there’s nothing like a good electronics community to find technical solutions and prove the concept in earlier stages. Sometimes, it’s not a good idea to include a powerful lithium battery in a device we are going to use for hours in our ear canals. And 3-D printers are great and will create new business opportunities, but do we really need consumers “printing” speakers? Others simply need to realize we now have powerful computers with touchscreens in our pockets. We don’t need more boxes and remote controls!

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